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Recently received QRSS signals

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After the recent reception report of my QRSS signal, I realised it had been a while since I had been running my QRSS receive setup so I decided to put it on.  The antenna is my standard HF doublet and the receiver is the K3, which was dialed to the 10.140 MHz.  For the software I use Baudline (previously mentioned here) which is different to the application used by most of the grabbers, Argo. I like Baudline, I can set it running for hours, save the recording as a file and do post processing on the received signal. For QRSS that processing is adjusting the colour display, colour aperture and time scale.  I feel I am slowly get more familiar with this powerful application, but I still have plenty to learn.

Here are some traces of signals I have received over the last few days.

KC7VHS located in La Cruces, New Mexico

AA5CK QRSS signal

AA5CK located in Sayre, Oklahoma

WA5DJJ QRSS signal

WA5DJJ located in La Cruces, New Mexico

VE1VDM QRSS signal

VE1VDM located in Upper Onslow, Nova Scotia

The QRSS transmitter of  Dave, WA5DJJ is described on his QRSS web page and if you scroll down to the bottom you will see a picture of Perry, KC7VHS, building his transmitter which was captured above. Theo, AA5CK, on his web page shows how he uses an iDuino board as the QRSS keyer.  He also explains the how he uses the key to create a dual frequency CW modulation for QRSS, which I have also seen in his QRSS trace. Vernon, VE1VDM is usually know for his QRSS grabber, when he transmits his signal is usually well received here at my QTH.

Finally, it is important to remember that the power level of these QRSS transmitters will be 1W or less, indeed usually a QRSS transmitter on 30m is around a one or two hundred milliWatts.

Additional

This afternoon (after making the posting) AA5CK’s signal was received again, so I clipped the dual frequency CW trace.  Here it is.

AA5CK DFCW QRSS trace

AA5CK dual frequency CW QRSS trace

To read it the ‘dits’ and ‘dahs’ are of the same duration, but the ‘dit’ is at the lower level to the ‘dah’.   The callsign should become clear, although the ‘K’ is a little faded.

Read more: VA3STL's Weblog


 
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